Things tagged 'tfl_consultation'

limited to the area of Lambeth Cyclists:

20 issues found for 'tfl_consultation':

  • Duke Hill St/Tooley St

    Created by SallyEva // 1 thread

    Proposals include:

    Introducing a 20mph speed limit along entire length of Duke Street Hill/Tooley Street (between Borough High Street and Tower Bridge Road)
    Introducing a 2 metre wide mandatory cycle lane westbound, on Duke Street Hill/Tooley Street, running between Borough High Street and Bermondsey Street junctions, separated from traffic with wands on the Duke Street Hill section
    Introducing a protected right turn ‘pocket’ for cyclists waiting to turn right into Bermondsey Street from Tooley Street
    Making Duke Street Hill no entry, apart from cyclists and buses, from the junction with A3 Borough High Street. This will mean that eastbound traffic along Duke Street Hill and Tooley Street as far as the junction with Bermondsey Street is restricted to buses and cycles only.
    Restricting access from side roads onto Tooley Street to westbound travel only. Any motorized vehicle turning onto Tooley Street from the following roads will not be able to turn onto and travel eastbound towards Bermondsey Street:
    Tooley Street onto Duke Hill Street
    Bridge Yard onto Tooley Street
    Cottons Lane onto Tooley Street
    Hay’s Lane onto Tooley Street
    Battlebridge Lane onto Tooley Street
    Westbound traffic will continue to be able to travel along this section of highway as it does at present (i.e. accessing via Bermondsey Street or from roads further east) which lead onto Tooley Street.

    This will be an interim scheme, reducing traffic in the short term. We are working on a more transformational scheme for Tooley Street, to extend the high-quality cycling provision proposed as part of Cycle Superhighway 4 towards London Bridge.

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  • St. Thomas Street, London Bridge reopening one-way access only

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says:

    What we plan to do
    Since the street was closed there has been more emphasis on the environment and reducing pollution, creating healthier places. So we are proposing to reopen the street one-way – westbound – for access only. Access only includes private vehicles, deliveries to the premises along the street, taxis picking-up and dropping-off at The Shard (note that the station taxi drop-off and pick-up is on London Bridge St by the News building) and residents. This will keep traffic to a minimum and make the place better for people walking and people cycling.

    For people walking
    Relocate the crossing and create a coloured, raised imprint area of road surface between Weston Street and The Shard indicating to drivers and people cycling that people walking are likely to be crossing making it easier and safer for people approaching the relocated crossing
    Introduce a 10mph speed limit. By making the street 10mph we will make it safer for people walking and people cycling and improve the local environment as traffic slows, reducing noise and air pollution

    For people cycling
    Cycling would be permitted along the full length of the street with the direction of traffic

    For people using buses or coaches
    The one way nature of the street allows for the reintroducton of coaches and buses, without congestion

    For people using taxis
    • We will provide for taxis to pick-up and drop-off visitors to The Shard

    The main changes people will notice apart from the reopening and resurfacing by Network Rail will be new signs (No motor vehicles except for access) and lines marked on the street (indicating taxi ranks etc). We are keeping the works to a minimum as plans develop to meet the local aspirations for the street which will avoid any disruptive and unnecessary works.

    As a result of these proposals general traffic will no longer be able to drive onto St Thomas St eastbound from Borough High Street. Since the closure this has mainly been taxis, private hire and deliveries but there is often congestion and risks from turning vehicles. By making it one-way we can remove the delays and hold-ups caused by turning vehicles, the extra pollution they cause, and reduce the risk of vehicles colliding with people walking and cycling.

    Private vehicles, taxis, private hire, delivery and servicing vehicles, people cycling and disabled blue badge holders will be able to access St Thomas St westbound from its junction with Crucifix Lane and Bermondsey St. to access The Shard and other businesses along St Thomas St.

    Our plans form part of the Mayor of London’s plan for Healthy Streets - a long-term vision to encourage more people to walk, cycle and use public transport by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. By providing more high quality spaces we can encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport, whilst keeping other traffic moving. These improvements will contribute to Healthy Streets by:

    Encouraging more people to walk and, with the next phase that this is facilitating, to cycle
    Improving the public realm and contributing to the wider regeneration of the area
    We will monitor the impacts of the one-way access-only arrangements and will continue to work with Southwark Council and the local community to meet the aspirations for St. Thomas St.

    We will aim to complete the new traffic management scheme by May 2018.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly Transport Committee Bus network design, safety

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly said:
    "Buses are the busiest form of public transport in London. The city has 675 bus routes, with around 9,000 buses in operation and over 19,000 bus stops. Approximately 2.5 billion bus passenger trips are made every year, around double the number made on London Underground.
    "TfL commissions private operators to run bus services in London, awarding seven-year contracts to operate bus routes. Although bus safety (in terms of casualty numbers) has improved over recent years, there was a spike in bus collision fatalities in 2015.
    "The London Assembly Transport Committee is investigating two aspects of bus services in London: Network Design and Safety."

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  • Mayor's Transport Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Draft Mayor's Transport Strategy 2017
    On June 21 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, published a draft of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The document sets out the Mayor’s policies and proposals to reshape transport in London over the next 25 years.

    About the strategy

    Transport has the potential to shape London, from the streets Londoners live, work and spend time on, to the Tube, rail and bus services they use every day.

    By using the Healthy Streets Approach to prioritise human health and experience in planning the city, the Mayor wants to change London’s transport mix so the city works better for everyone.

    Three key themes are at the heart of the strategy.

    1. Healthy Streets and healthy people
    Creating streets and street networks that encourage walking, cycling and public transport use will reduce car dependency and the health problems it creates.

    2. A good public transport experience
    Public transport is the most efficient way for people to travel over distances that are too long to walk or cycle, and a shift from private car to public transport could dramatically reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets.

    3. New homes and jobs
    More people than ever want to live and work in London. Planning the city around walking, cycling and public transport use will unlock growth in new areas and ensure that London grows in a way that benefits everyone.

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  • Camberwell Green junction

    Created by Elizabeth E. // 1 thread

    TfL are making changes to junction because of safety issues.

    For Cyclists:

    Two-stage right turns at the junction in the west to south and east to north directions
    An early release at the traffic lights on all four arms of the junction
    Deeper Advanced Stop Lines (ASLs)
    Mandatory cycle lane on Camberwell Church Street westbound approach to operate at all times
    St Giles bus stop moved further west from the Vicarage Grove junction to improve safety of left turning cyclists on the LCN 23 cycle route
    Resurfacing throughout the junction.
    Retention of the 20mph speed limit at the junction and on all the approaches.

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  • Tooting Bec Road consultation

    Created by jon_events // 2 threads

    TfL are now consulting on these proposals. I ran a petition several years ago now, which I hope nudged City Hall into action.

    Really pleased that we have some solid proposals on the table. It's clear that TfL could do better.

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  • Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says:
    We are seeking your view on our proposals for Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road; developed through dialogue with the Nine Elms Vauxhall Partnership.
    We propose to transform the 2.5km stretch of road from the Vauxhall Gyratory, along Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road to Macduff Road, connecting to Cycle Superhighway 8 (CS8). Our proposed changes would act as a backbone to the major developments taking place in the area, improving conditions for pedestrians, cyclists, and bus passengers, as well creating a more pleasant and characterful street environment and a sense of destination to the area.
    Our proposals are being funded through contributions from developers administered by London Borough of Wandsworth.
    Ahead of these proposals and in response to the ongoing levels of construction in the area, we will implement a small scale, interim scheme during summer 2017 which looks to increase safety in the area and enhance the urban realm. More information on this scheme can be found here.

    What are we proposing?
    We are proposing a complete redesign of the road layout on Nine Elms Lane and the eastern part of Battersea Park Road to deliver improvements for pedestrians, cyclists and bus users and accommodate future growth of the area. Proposals include:
    New, wide footways
    23 new and improved signalised crossing points
    A new cycle route on the south of the Thames from CS8 at Macduff Road to Vauxhall Gyratory, featuring:
    ‘Stepped’ cycle tracks in both directions (see below) from Vauxhall Gyratory to the new Battersea Power Station London Underground entrance
    Dedicated segregation and allocated time for cyclists at some junctions
    Bus stop bypasses provided in some locations
    Stepped cycle tracks are vertically separated from the footway and main carriageway.
    Increase in bus lanes to provide reliable journey times to bus passengers
    Improved junctions by upgrading signals at 5 junctions and providing 3 new signalised junctions
    Improvements to the street environment, which would see high quality finishes, repaving and new trees planted where possible
    We would ensure all design and construction is closely coordinated with our plans to transform Vauxhall gyratory.

    Why are we proposing this?
    As part of the Mayor’s Opportunity Area Planning Framework, Vauxhall, Nine Elms and Battersea has been identified as an area for major redevelopment. Nine Elms Lane and the eastern part of Battersea Park Road is a major gateway and transport artery for the area.
    Development is well underway and will be continuing in the coming years, which includes over 40 major developments with new residential and office units, two new town centres at Battersea Power Station and Vauxhall and two new London Underground stations on a new Northern Line Extension, at Nine Elms and Battersea. 20,000 new homes are being built, creating 22,000 construction jobs and a further 25,000 new jobs between now and 2027. Significant improvements are also being made to the public realm, which will include a new 11-acre Nine Elms Park linking Battersea Power Station to Vauxhall Cross.
    In response to these levels of development and the change in land use, we have been presented with an opportunity to enhance the highway, creating a backbone to the development and a destination where customers are encouraged to walk, cycle and use public transport.
    The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s plan for Healthy Streets – a long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. We are proposing substantial improvements for pedestrians, cyclists and bus passengers in the area to help encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport.

    Summary of the proposed changes

    Cycling facilities
    New segregated cycle lanes in both directions along most sections of the route. We would make space for these by reallocating space from general traffic and realigning traffic lanes
    Improvements to safety for cyclists provided through early starts at certain junctions, a cycle only stage at certain junctions, bus stop bypasses and two-stage right turn facilities
    New signalised junctions at Savona Street and Battersea Park Road, Thessaly Road and Battersea Park Road, and Cringle Street and Nine Elms Lane
    Ponton Road would see a redesigned junction providing cyclists travelling westbound with a cycle only green stage at the traffic light. Cyclists travelling eastbound, straight across the junction, continuing on Nine Elms Lane would be provided with a bypass lane
    Cycle only stages would be provided at Kirtling Street and Ponton Road.

    Road design and layout
    New signalised junction at Savona Street to incorporate the opening of the new road opposite called Prospect Way
    New signalised junction at Thessaly Road, subject to outcome of the P5 Bus extension consultation
    New signalised junction at Cringle Street to manage traffic in and out of the new side road, provide an early start for cyclists and new pedestrian crossing points
    Banned left turn from Battersea Park Road into Cringle Street for all traffic due to the tight turn
    Bus facilities
    Widened bus lanes, where possible to provide passing space for cyclists around buses waiting at stops
    Around 2km of bus lanes between Vauxhall Gyratory and Prince of Wales Drive, created by removing central islands and realigning traffic lanes
    Changes to bus lane hours of operation to provide reliable journey times to bus passengers through the area
    We are separately consulting on a proposed extension to bus route P5 to Battersea Power Station. Please see consultation here. This proposal will be assessed and taken forward separately to the proposed changes for Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road
    Pedestrian facilities and crossings
    Where space allows, junctions would have footway buildouts to reduce pedestrian crossing widths and provide additional space for pedestrians
    The new signalised junction at Savona Street would provide signalised pedestrian facilities on the north, south and west arms of the junction
    The Kirtling Street junction would see a new signalised pedestrian crossing on the western arm
    The new Cringle Street junction would see new signalised pedestrian crossings on all arms of the junction
    A new signalised staggered pedestrian crossing would be provided outside Riverside Court
    We have used computer analysis to help us ensure our proposals are fit for future growth in pedestrian numbers

    Journey times for motorists and bus passengers
    We have carried out traffic modelling analysis to predict how the proposals might affect journey times through the scheme area. A summary of this analysis is available

    Parking and loading
    The disabled parking bay outside The Battersea Medical Centre would be extended to 12 metres long to provide 2 parking spaces. It would also be relocated onto the footway
    All on-street parking bays would have consistent hours of operating, allowing off peak peaking and/or loading

    Deliveries and servicing
    We continue to work with businesses and freight operators to minimise the impact of these proposals on their operations. If your home or workplace is on or near the proposed route, please let us know if the proposals could affect your deliveries, collections and servicing. We would encourage you to discuss the proposals with companies undertaking these operations.

    Environment
    Our proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by:
    Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing people to better enjoy the area
    Increasing provision for active modes - walking and cycling
    Exploring opportunities and working with developers to achieve more greening
    Creating a sense of place with the proposed new urban realm high quality finishes which would look to include Sustainable Urban Drainage solutions in our proposals
    Although we do not expect an increase to the number of motor vehicles in the area, our proposals may change how traffic moves around some roads, which may result in some associated and localised changes to air quality and noise levels. Environmental surveys and modelling would take place as part of our ongoing evaluation of these proposals.

    Equalities
    In considering the design of our streets, we closely consider the needs of all users throughout the design process. On significant infrastructure projects, we:
    Complete Equality Impact Assessments (EIA) at the outset of the project, to review potential impacts on equality target groups, including disabled people
    Carry out public consultations, including targeted engagement with specific users such as (amongst many others): Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs for the Blind, Age Concern, Transport for All, and the National Autistic Society
    Ensure we comply with established guidance – such as the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges – which includes detailed requirements for disabled people
    The EIA for Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road will continue to be developed following the outcome of this public consultation, incorporating feedback received.

    Next steps
    We will analyse and consider all of the responses received to the consultation, and publish our response later this year. Construction of the scheme would be subject to the outcome of this consultation, and further approvals. Should we decide to go ahead, we would aim to start construction in 2020/2021.

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  • Waterloo roundabout

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    We want your views on proposals to help inform our LCC response.

    TfL says:

    Overview:
    We want your views on our proposals to create a better Waterloo. We’ve developed these proposals over the past 10 years by working with local stakeholders and the community. The original vision can be found here. Our proposals aim to create a healthier and safer environment for people to walk and cycle and use public transport as well as support the regeneration and growth of Waterloo. These proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by:
    Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing people to better enjoy the area
    Creating a healthier and safer environment
    Planting more trees to replace the removal of trees which will have the potential to benefit biodiversity, landscaping and wildlife
    Creating a sense of place with the proposed new public square
    Creating a focal point for Waterloo, helping build on it as a cultural destination and support the regeneration and growth of Waterloo
    Keeping buses and traffic moving through the area.
    The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s plan for Healthy Streets - a long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle and use public transport by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming.

    What we are proposing

    Our proposals would:
    Create a new tree-filled public square supporting civic and cultural life of the area by moving the existing bus stops from Tenison Way to an improved bus station on Waterloo Road, closing the south-west arm of the roundabout and changing the remaining carriageway to two-way traffic
    Introduce segregated cycle lanes making cycling around Waterloo roundabout safer
    Create new pedestrian routes and permanently remove some subways (but keep others) to help create more direct walking routes towards the river Thames. The subways can be unpleasant and divisive, inaccessible to large sections of the community
    Widen the footways on Waterloo Road to give more space to pedestrians and waiting bus passengers by narrowing the carriageway through removing a section of bus lane
    Relocate northbound and southbound bus stops to keep traffic moving on Waterloo Road
    Ban the right turns from Waterloo Road into Stamford Street and from Concert Hall Approach (except for buses) to keep traffic moving.

    Why We Are Consulting

    Encourage more walking and cycling and use of buses by
    Making it easier, safer and more pleasant
    Keeping buses and traffic moving through the area
    Provide a sense of place and improve the environment by
    Creating a new, high-quality, traffic-free, green public space to become a focal point for Waterloo supporting the civic and cultural life of the area
    Support the regeneration and growth of Waterloo
    Currently the area is overcrowded and difficult to navigate for pedestrians, bus passengers and cyclists. This is exacerbated by street clutter and level differences that make it confusing and harder for people to get to where they want to go.
    It will get even busier because of major planned developments, including increasing capacity at Waterloo station. The roundabout is dominated by motor traffic and can be intimidating and unpleasant to walk and cycle.
    By giving cyclists more space and time to pass through the area more easily, and by providing new signalised crossings, a new public space and wider footways for pedestrians and waiting bus passengers, we can encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport, whilst keeping other traffic moving.
    Waterloo is a very important transport hub with Europe’s busiest rail station, a strategic bus interchange, and large numbers of cyclists and some key cycle routes passing through it.
    It is also home to international visitor and cultural attractions, workplaces, residents and academic institutions.
    Our proposals are designed to improve safety for vulnerable road users by introducing dedicated facilities, such as signalised pedestrian crossings, new cycle lanes and separate cycle signals. Waterloo roundabout is one of 33 locations across London we are prioritising as part of our Safer Junctions programme.
    Overall, these proposals are designed to make it easier, safer and more attractive to walk, cycle and use public transport in the area, and to prepare for and stimulate further growth and regeneration.

    Potential effects of our proposals

    Journey times
    We expect the proposals would result in changes, both positive and negative, to journey times for motorists, bus passengers and cyclists once complete. Click here for the information (PDF) that explains the impacts we expect our proposals to have on journey times and is accompanied by a more detailed table of data.

    Walking
    We want to make walking more convenient and attractive. There are a number of places where overcrowding is common such as Tenison Way and Waterloo Road:
    The proposed new public space would provide lots more room for pedestrians and create a key focal point in the local area with crossings relocated to where people want to cross
    Wider and clearer footways would reduce overcrowding on Waterloo Road
    Walking routes would be opened up, improving way finding and permeability.

    Cycling
    Taken from survey data in 2013 cyclists make-up 40% of traffic around Waterloo roundabout in the AM peak.
    We want to make cycling in Waterloo easier, safer and more attractive. Our proposals provide dedicated time and space for cyclists and aim to reduce road casualties by addressing the patterns of past collisions:
    Segregated cycle lanes around the new peninsula. The impact of this is balanced with bus and general traffic movements by making some strutural changes to the roundabout
    Separate cycle signals on traffic lights would reduce the number of conflicts with general traffic
    Existing cycle parking stands would be relocated
    The cycle hire docking station outside Kings College would be relocated
    We are working with other teams delivering projects that would provide better and safer connections to existing and planned cycle routes.

    Bus passengers
    Waterloo is a strategic part of the London bus network, with some of its busiest routes serving the area, used by 20,000 passengers a day. Our proposals aim to encourage more people onto buses and keep all traffic moving:
    An improved bus station and new public square would provide a much improved interchange and waiting environment for bus passengers
    Wider footways on Waterloo Road would provide a larger and safer area for waiting bus passengers and accommodate future growth in numbers
    Bus stops would be relocated from Tenison Way to the improved bus station on Waterloo Road and the northbound and southbound bus stops on Waterloo Road would be consolidated.
    A short section of bus lane on Waterloo Road would be removed to keep traffic moving.

    General traffic
    We want to reduce the dominance of traffic around Waterloo by creating an environment which encourages people to walk, cycle or use public transport. As a result:
    There would be some changes to general traffic journey times as a result of these proposals. We would remove the south-western side of the roundabout to create the new public space. Traffic would flow two-way around the new peninsula
    The section of northbound bus lane on Waterloo Road from the junction with The Cut would be removed to provide more space for pedestrians. Buses would share the general traffic lane and pull-in to the relocated bus stops allowing traffic to pass
    The right turn from Waterloo Road into Stamford Street and the right turn from Concert Hall Approach (except for buses) would be banned to keep traffic moving through the area.
    We do not develop proposals to introduce traffic restrictions without carefully considering the potential impacts and exploring alternative solutions. The restrictions are proposed to either address a safety issue, or help the signalised junction operate more efficiently and minimise potential journey time delays to road users.

    Deliveries and servicing
    Some changes to existing servicing arrangements may be required. If your home or workplace is on or near the proposed changes, please let us know if the proposals could affect your deliveries, collections and servicing. We would encourage you to discuss the proposals with companies undertaking these operations.

    Taxis
    The main taxi rank is on Station Approach and is not affected by these proposals.

    Rail and London Underground users
    Network Rail has a programme of works to increase capacity at Waterloo Station and London Underground has plans to increase Bakerloo and Northern Line services, increasing the numbers of people using Waterloo to interchange. Our proposals would make it easier and more attractive for passengers to continue their journeys on foot, cycle or bus.

    Environment
    Air pollution is one of the most significant challenges facing London, affecting the health of all Londoners. As part of the plans for new measures to tackle London’s current poor air quality, we have been consulting on proposals to bring forward the introduction of the London Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ).
    A number of other schemes to improve London’s air quality are planned, including taking steps to reduce air pollution from our bus fleet, reducing emissions from taxis and private hire vehicles, setting up five ‘Low Emission Neighbourhoods’ and expanding the electric vehicle charging network, as well as making it simpler to use. We are investing to make London’s streets healthy, safe and attractive places to walk and cycle. Enabling more journeys to be made on foot or by bike can help reduce private vehicle use and associated emissions. Click here for more information on how we are creating Healthy Streets and click here for the draft Mayor's Transport Strategy. Our proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by:

    Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing people to better enjoy the area
    Exploring opportunities to achieve more greening
    Creating a sense of place with the proposed new public square and providing additional seating.
    As our proposals for Waterloo would change how traffic moves around the area, we expect there would be some associated and localised changes to air quality and noise levels. We will be carrying-out environmental surveys and environmental modelling to help our design development.

    Security barriers on Waterloo Bridge
    The Metropolitan Police Service has installed barriers to increase security on London’s busiest bridges. Our proposals will aim to ensure that the security of all road users is maintained in the future.

    Working with the local community
    TfL has been working with Lambeth Council and engaging with businesses, local stakeholders and the Mayor to develop these proposals over the years. These are the planning documents and guidance consulted on with the local community that have helped us develop these proposals:
    A local college, Morley College, has produced a photo record to capture the sense of place and character of the area that these proposals will build on. These photos will be on show at the public events and around Waterloo.
    There is a public art poem by the poet Sue Hubbard called “Eurydice” on the wall of one the subways we propose to remove. The poem was written as part of the renovation of the South Bank especially for the underpass that leads from Victory Arch at Waterloo Station to the BFI IMAX cinema. We will work with local stakeholders to investigate how we can include the poem in the new public space.

    Next steps
    Subject to the outcome of this consultation, should we proceed with these proposals, we would look to start construction in late 2019 for a period of up to 18 months.
    We are aware that there is a lot of construction occurring in the Waterloo area and these changes are likely to cause further disruption. We would work with the local community, Lambeth Council, SBEG, WeAreWaterloo and surrounding developers to coordinate works and deliveries to minimise this impact as far as possible.

    Previous consultations
    As part of the Mayor’s Better Junctions Review we made improvements at the roundabout to reduce accidents by providing more priority and road space for cyclists, particularly at the junctions with Stamford Street and Waterloo Road.
    Later the speed limit was reduced to 20mph and will be retained under these proposals.

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  • Lambeth Bridge North & South

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says:

    Overview:
    We have developed proposals to transform the road layout at the northern and southern roundabouts at Lambeth Bridge to create a safer environment for cycling and walking. We would also make changes to some approach roads and to the bridge itself.
    Focussing on road safety, our proposals are designed to keep traffic moving along these key routes, whilst providing a better balance to the way that space on the road is allocated.
    Our proposals would require changes to the way general traffic moves through the area, including new left or right turn traffic restrictions on some roads at each end of the bridge.

    What are we proposing?
    We propose to convert both the northern and the southern roundabouts of Lambeth Bridge into crossroad junctions, with traffic signals and signalised pedestrian crossings. At each junction, dedicated space would be given for cyclists and new pedestrian areas would be created.
    To support these transformational plans, changes to the road layout are also proposed on Lambeth Bridge itself, at the Millbank north junction with Great Peter Street and along Lambeth Palace Road. These layout changes include two general traffic lanes at each exit from the bridge, the introduction of a signalised pedestrian crossing at the Millbank north junction with Great Peter Street, and the extension of the southbound bus lane on Lambeth Palace Road.
    We have also developed public realm improvements, sensitive to the heritage of the area. These designs propose to further enhance the look and feel of the area so that we can promote a real sense of place to Lambeth Bridge and its surrounds.
    The Metropolitan Police Service has installed barriers to increase security on London’s busiest bridges. Our proposals will aim to ensure that the security of all road users is maintained in the future.

    We are also seeking views on:
    Longer-term plans for the pedestrian underpass at Albert Embankment
    A potential new location for the palm tree at Lambeth Bridge north
    The current traffic speed at Lambeth Bridge north and south

    Why are we proposing it?

    Safety
    Our proposals are designed to improve safety at both northern and southern roundabouts by introducing dedicated facilities for vulnerable road users, such as signalised pedestrian crossings, new cycle lanes and separate cycle signals. The northern roundabout in particular has a high proportion of collisions involving cyclists, and is one of 33 locations across London we are prioritising as part of our Safer Junctions programme.

    Healthy Streets to encourage walking and cycling
    The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. Both roundabouts and Lambeth Bridge are currently dominated by motor traffic and can be intimidating and unpleasant places to walk and cycle. By giving cyclists space and time to pass through the junction more easily, and by providing new signalised crossings and clearer footways for pedestrians, we can encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport, whilst keeping other traffic moving.

    Building a local cycle network
    Lambeth Bridge and its roundabouts lie on busy cycle commuter routes. Making the area safer and more welcoming for cyclists would help build connections to existing infrastructure, such as Cycle Superhighway Route 8 on Millbank, and planned improvements, such as Westminster Bridge and Central London Grid routes. The following map shows how our proposals would build on cycling connectivity in the area.

    The impacts of our proposals

    Journey times
    Our proposals have been designed to not have a disproportionate impact on other road users. However we expect there would be changes, both positive and negative, to journey times for motorists, bus passengers and cyclists.
    More detailed information on the traffic impacts of the Lambeth Bridge proposals, including tables of the likely journey time impacts, can be found here https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/lambeth-bridge/user_uploads/traffic-impacts-and-data-table.pdf
    Should these proposals go ahead, we would take a number of steps to ensure that the changes made along the route are balanced. We are investing in advanced traffic signal technology to allow us to better manage traffic depending on differing conditions at any given time.

    Turning restrictions
    Our proposals include a number of restrictions to turning movements:

    ‘Straight-ahead only’ for traffic exiting Millbank north
    A time-of-day banned right-turn from Millbank south onto Lambeth Bridge during the evening peak
    A banned left-turn for northbound traffic from Millbank south into Horseferry Road
    ‘Straight-ahead only’ for traffic exiting Horseferry Road
    A banned left-turn from Lambeth Palace Road onto Lambeth Road.
    A banned right-turn from Lambeth Road onto Lambeth Palace Road.
    We do not develop proposals to introduce traffic restrictions without carefully considering the potential impacts and exploring alternative solutions. The restrictions are proposed either to address a safety issue or to help the signalised junction operate more efficiently, minimising potential journey time delays to road users.

    The environment

    Air and noise
    Although the designs for Lambeth Bridge north and south are not expected to increase the number of motor vehicles in the area, our proposals may change how traffic moves around some roads, which may result in some associated and localised changes to air quality and noise levels. Environmental surveys and modelling would take place as part of our ongoing evaluation of these proposals.

    Tree removal
    Our proposals require the removal or relocation of a number of trees in order to accommodate the new road layout:
    The iconic phoenix palm tree at the centre of the roundabout on the northern side of Lambeth Bridge would look to be relocated
    Seven trees at the centre of the roundabout on the southern side of Lambeth Bridge would need to be removed
    One tree at the junction of Millbank and Great Peter Street would need to be removed
    New trees will be planted at Lambeth Bridge north and south as part of proposed urban realm improvements. Subject to the outcome of consultation, tree species would be determined during detailed design.

    Visual environment
    Our proposed urban realm improvements aim to improve the look and feel of the area, as shown in our artists’ impressions.

    Features include:
    Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing pedestrians and cyclists to better enjoy the area
    Increasing the surface area of the public realm by approximately 1,370 square metres at Lambeth Bridge north and approximately 1,790 square metres at Lambeth Bridge south
    Attracting more visitors to the area and local attractions such as Victoria Tower Gardens
    Planting new trees bringing overall benefits for the area’s biodiversity and landscape
    Providing new seating
    New footway materials to improve the look of the streets along Albert Embankment, Lambeth Palace Road, Millbank and Lambeth Bridge
    The removal of unnecessary and duplicate poles, signs and other street furniture
    Upgrades where necessary to existing lighting and drainage
    Provision of more cycle parking
    An opportunity to provide additional Cycle Hire stations
    Upgraded wayfinding for example to Newport Street Gallery
    Equalities
    In considering the design of our streets, we closely consider the needs of all users throughout the design process. On significant infrastructure projects, we:

    Complete Equality Impact Assessments (EqIA), to review potential impacts on equality target groups, including disabled people
    Carry out public consultations, including targeted engagement with specific users such as (amongst many others): Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs for the Blind, Age Concern, Transport for All, and the National Autistic Society
    Ensure we comply with established guidance – such as the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges – which includes detailed requirements for disabled people
    The EqIA for Lambeth Bridge north and south will continue to be developed following the outcome of this public consultation, incorporating feedback received.

    Other options considered but not taken forward
    We considered a number of alternative designs before taking forward our current proposals.
    At Lambeth Bridge south, we considered retaining the roundabout, but this provided minimal benefits for cyclists. We also considered ‘hold the left’ turn facilities on Lambeth Road and Lambeth Bridge, which separate cyclists from other traffic with separate traffic signals. However this scenario would have caused significant traffic queueing due to the extra signal phase required and was difficult to accommodate due to the structure of the bridge.
    We also considered a number of designs at Lambeth Bridge north including a signalised junction and a ‘Dutch style’ roundabout with a physically separated cycle track around the edge of the roundabout. However, our modelling indicated that this would have had significant impact on journey times for other road users in the area, including thousands of bus passengers.
    Having considered a number of designs, we believe the current proposals would achieve the best balance for all road users.

    Related schemes
    Lambeth north interim scheme
    During March 2017, we delivered interim safety improvements at Lambeth Bridge northern roundabout.
    The changes were timed to bring improvements whilst we continued with plans to re-work the junction's layout for the long-term.

    Next steps
    Subject to the outcome of this consultation, should we proceed with these proposals, we would look to start construction in late 2018.
    Although construction would cause some disruption, we would take steps to minimise this as far as possible.
    Building in late 2018 would allow us to coordinate with major planned maintenance work on Lambeth Bridge, and with work currently taking place at Westminster Bridge South.

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  • Junction of A100 Tower Bridge Road and Tanner Street

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL Overview
    In partnership with the London Borough of Southwark, we have developed proposals to improve the provision for cyclists and other road users around Tower Bridge Road/Tanner Street junction, and we would like to hear your views.

    What are we proposing?
    The proposals are part of the Central London Grid – a network of cycle routes in Zone 1. The route passes along Tanner Street, Southwark Council consulted on proposals on the rest of the route in autumn 2015, including proposals for the one-way operation of Tanner Street. Our proposals aim to improve safety and create more space for cyclists, and have been coordinated with Southwark Council’s designs.
    Our proposals also include changes to traffic and bus lanes, as well as new traffic restrictions and improved pedestrian crossings.

    The enclosed consultation drawing shows the proposals for this junction. The numbered descriptions below correspond with the numbered labels on the drawing.
    1 Carriageway to be widened by 0.5 metres to improve traffic flow. There will still be sufficient width maintained on the footway.
    2 Centre lines to be altered to provide two northbound general traffic lanes further back from the junction with Druid Street
    3 New one-way westbound on Tanner Street between Tower Bridge Road and Archie Street to create space for a segregated two-way cycle track
    4 New one-way eastbound on Tanner Street between Tower Bridge Road and Pope Street to allow for contraflow cycle provision
    5 Segregated bi- directional cycle track to allow cyclists to approach and exit the junction with substantially reduced risk of conflict with motor vehicles
    6 New segregated contraflow cycle track to parallel crossing to allow for safer approach for cyclists, and to decrease potential conflict between modes of traffic. This would require the relocation of a loading bay (see 9 and 10)
    7 New parallel cycle/pedestrian crossing to connect the cycle route on Tanner Street and allow cyclists to conveniently cross Tower Bridge Road separately from pedestrians
    8 Cycle stands to be relocated to allow for widened traffic lanes on the approach to the junction, and to prevent conflict between traffic modes
    9 Loading bay relocated from Tanner Street to Tower Bridge Road to create space for the contraflow cycle track (see 6). The same operating hours will apply
    10 New position of relocated loading bay from Tanner Street (see 9)
    11 Loading bay relocated 12m south to provide enough space for traffic to merge. Operating hours will remain the same.
    12 New bus lane (Hours of operation: Mon –Sat, 7am-10am, 4pm-7pm) to make journeys faster and more reliable for bus passengers. We would create space by moving the centre line on this section of Tower Bridge Road.

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  • Central London Cycling Grid Borough High Street/Newcomen Street junction

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Overview
    We are seeking your views on proposed changes to the junction of Borough High Street with Union Street and Newcomen Street. The proposals are part of the Central London Cycling Grid - a network of cycle routes in Zone 1.
    This junction forms part of the Blackfriars to Tower Bridge Road route. The London Borough of Southwark consulted on other parts of this route in October 2015 – further details can be found here:
    What are we proposing?
    Our proposals aim to improve safety for cyclists and accommodate the predicted increase in cyclists along this route. The design would provide a more direct route for eastbound cyclists by removing a long detour and allowing them to proceed along Newcomen Street. By altering the signal phasing of the junction, we would also enable cyclists on Borough High Street to turn onto the new route.
    Why are we proposing this?
    The Blackfriars to Tower Bridge Road Route will provide a safer and more pleasant journey through a section of the city that is already popular among commuters as well as recreational cyclists. Transport for London and Southwark Council have identified certain junctions and sections of the proposed route that could be modified to improve cycle accessibility as well as safety for all users of the road, including pedestrians.
    By closing a short section of Newcomen Street to motor vehicles and creating two-way access to the junction, we will remove a long detour from the cycle route. Changes to signal phasing at the junction, and modifications to existing street furniture, will create safer routes for cyclists without affecting pedestrian accessibility.
    At construction stage the junction would also be resurfaced. Proposals for this junction are:
    Union Street
    Existing contra-flow cycle lane retained for cyclists travelling westbound on Union Street. This would connect to Southwark Council’s proposals for Union Street.
    Existing advanced stop line extended to 5m with a cycle feeder lane. These extended facilities would provide cyclists with a larger waiting area in front of motor traffic, improving their visibility, and allowing them to safely move away at the traffic lights.
    Borough High Street
    Dedicated low-level cycle signals to inform cyclists of when to safely proceed across Borough High Street from Union Street and Newcomen Street.
    Pedestrian islands widened to improve pedestrian accessibility across Borough High Street.
    Cyclists permitted to turn left onto Union Street and Newcomen Street. This movement is currently banned and would remain banned for other vehicles. This allows cyclists on Borough High Street to join the route. The signal phasing would be altered to permit this movement. NOTE: All vehicles (including cyclists) would continue to be banned from turning right into Union Street or Newcomen Street.
    All-round pedestrian signal phase retained so that pedestrians can safely make all movements across the junction at the same time.
    Newcomen Street
    Section of Newcomen Street closed to motorised traffic. Bollards would be installed approximately 30m west of the junction to enforce road closure to motorised traffic except for emergency access. NOTE: Newcomen Street is a borough-owned road and this aspect of the scheme would be progressed by the London Borough of Southwark.
    Two-way cycling permitted on Newcomen Street allowing cyclists travelling eastbound to proceed directly from Union Street, and turn left from Borough High Street.
    Existing footways widened to improve pedestrian accessibility.
    We have carried out traffic modelling for this proposal. The results indicate that the proposed changes can be accommodated without undue delay to any road user.

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  • East-West Cycle Superhighway - phase 2 consultation

    Created by Rosie Downes // 11 threads

    TfL are consulting on plans for the East-West cycle superhighway in Hyde Park and St James's Park. The proposals can be seen at https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/cycling/eastwest?cid=cycle-east-west

    The LCC office has set up this thread to facilitate discussion in advance of submitting its response to the consultation. The consultation closes on 29th March.

    To ensure that your comments will be taken into account when composing LCC’s response please make sure that your registered identity on Cyclescape includes your full name and whether you are a member of LCC and any local LCC group. (You can add these details by clicking on your name at the top of the page and then the Edit Profile tab.)

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